What is the Ray Cronise Diet?


Many people struggle to find a diet that works for them; many more have trouble actually sticking to said diet. This can be for various reasons -- not having the time in the day to cook or shop healthy, feeling pressured to join in when people are eating unhealthy in social settings, not having enough money to purchase healthy foods. 

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Some of us have just been taught improper nutrition. Did you know the food triangle we grew up in is considered highly inaccurate? Some adults may not realize that the food triangle has been revised to be more low carb and higher in veggies over the years.

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But there could be a bigger, more difficult to break reason for stubborn, unhealthy eating habits: Our bodies adapt to what we eat and tend to want to stick with that. So even when we try to change our eating habits for optimal health, for example, going on a vegan diet, our bodies crave the unhealthy foods we were eating before.

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This is where Ray Cronise comes in. Ray Cronise is a former NASA scientist who focuses on plant-based nutrition and lifestyle transformation through as dieters eat to live rather than for entertainment or craving purposes. Some major celebrities like Penn Jillette and Kevin Smith have famously subscribed to the plant diet created by Ray Cronise. Still, some dietitians might warn that Ray Cronise's supposed "potato diet" might actually be kind of dangerous. 

Read on for more information about the details and potential dangers or benefits of Ray Cronise's plant-based nutrition.

Why Ray Cronise  Believes in Plant-Based Diets 

According to Ray Cronise, there are a few really huge benefits of plant-based nutrition that offer optimal health. Ray Cronise says a plant-based diet can reduce the risk of obesity and possibly stave off heart disease by lowering the risk of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, type 2 diabetes, some types of cancer, and more.

Some perhaps less notable benefits of Ray Cronise's diet could be easing symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, heartburn, and even some skin issues like eczema and acne. 

Eating Only One Food to Lose Weight May Be a Bad Idea

One of Ray Cronise's plant-based nutrition's supposed tenets is the practice of eating only one type of veggie -- hence the nickname given to Ray Cronise's method: the potato diet. Fans and practitioners of Ray Cronise's method sometimes prefer to refer to his vegan diet as the nutritarian diet.

Dietitians warn against eating only one type of food for a prolonged period of time, as this could result in major malnutrition. One of the most obvious side effects of the one food diet might be scurvy, but according to dietitians, organ failure could occur, as well as the eating of the muscle by your own body.

While this does, indeed, sound quite dangerous, believers in Ray Cronise's methods have defended his programs, saying that the single food (or potato diet) stage does not last very long and that other foods are quickly introduced and consumed daily.

What Ray Cronise Recommends For Folks Struggling To Go Plant-Based

Ray Cronise suggests eating mainly the side dishes of a meal rather than the main course. This basically means eating things like potatoes and steamed vegetables and leaving out the steak. The former NASA scientist says this is easier than it sounds because most people's dinner plates are already mostly filled with veggies, so it's just a matter of leaving out that one meat-based part of the meal. Ray Cronise says this is because most meals are built from "the bottom of the food triangle," meaning they are loaded with more veggies than any other food option.

That previously mentioned "potato diet" is reportedly used to help cleanse the palate while trying to adjust to your new vegan diet. It is meant to retrain your tastebuds to cut down on cravings for meat and carbohydrates so that you might be able to better stick to your new lifestyle transformation. The diet is actually made up of healthy choices such as legumes, fruits, whole grains, nuts, seeds, and of course, veggies.

Is losing weight without hunger possible?

A major reason people tend not to stick to a vegan diet, or just a more healthy diet in general, is that they feel as though they are constantly hungry. Meat and carbs tend to fill people up quite easily, meaning that they need to eat less food to feel satisfied with their meal. So, when someone decides to switch to a low carb diet, they tend to feel as though they are always hungry.

According to Ray Cronise, you absolutely can partake in a vegan diet and could even enjoy 100-pound weight loss without feeling like you are starving. This begins with that "potato diet" (Ray Cronise reportedly also allows other starches and beans at the beginning of this lifestyle transformation). Starches, beans, and potatoes are certainly filling, so subsisting on these items is meant to help a person lose weight while still feeling as if they are eating enough every day.

Eventually, other healthy foods are added, like salads and meatless soups. A full meal is certainly possible when eating Ray Cronise's plant-based diet.

This could mean that other trendy weight loss methods  such as intermittent fasting, which is known to cause hunger complaints, could be avoided while on this "potato diet."

People Also Ask

What is the Ray cronise diet?

A plant-based nutrition lifestyle made up of low carb, whole food options resulting in a vegan diet intended to fight obesity -- often nicknamed the "potato diet" or the "sides diet." This method often starts with a couple of weeks of eating only one filling vegetable and then reintroducing other healthy options like salads.

 

What is allowed on the potato diet?

Potatoes, starches, and beans. But the potato diet part of this diet generally only lasts around two weeks.

Is a baked potato good for weight loss?

According to Penn Jillette's weight loss journey, baked potatoes are certainly good for weight loss. However, the Las Vegas illusionist (formerly of Penn & Teller) made sure his baked potatoes were oil-free, butter-free, and were not topped with any fatty condiments such as bacon, cheese, or sour cream. Essentially, the baked potatoes were just that, plain baked potatoes.

Which potato is best for weight loss?

Plain white potatoes are said to be the best for weight loss. This can be cooked in any way desired, including hash browns, as long as the cooking method is oil-free.

Are sweet potatoes good for weight loss?

Some dietitians believe that sweet potatoes are bad for weight loss because they have more carbohydrates than white potatoes. 

Are potatoes healthier than rice?

This is a difficult question to answer, as each option holds a different nutritional value. Rice and potatoes are both loaded with vitamins and minerals, just different kinds. Rice offers more fiber, but only by a gram if you eat baked potatoes with the skin instead of, say, mashed potatoes. Both are considered to be good options when aiming for weight loss. 

Can you drink coffee on a potato diet?

Yes! Coffee is fine to drink when on the potato diet; however, it is recommended that plain black coffee be consumed to keep drinks low carb and sugar-free. Make sure to skip sugars, creamers, and milk.

How did Penn Jillette lose so much weight?

Penn Jillette is said to have opted into Ray Cronise's potato diet. The former Las Vegas magician ate five potatoes, losing 14 pounds in two weeks. Adding other nutritional, low carb vegan diet options like veggies into his meal plan, Penn Jillette saw a 100-pound weight loss in only four months.

How many times a week should you eat potatoes?

Starchy foods are recommended not to be eaten more than five times per week for women and six for men for optimal health. This includes all starches, not just potatoes. Though some experts believe potatoes should be eaten no more than four times per week. This guideline can vary depending on underlying health issues, such as diabetes or high blood pressure.

Sources

https://www.pritikin.com/eating-potatoes-losing-100-pounds

https://www.today.com/health/how-many-times-week-can-we-eat-potatoes-still-be-t93141

https://healthyeating.sfgate.com/nutrients-rice-vs-potatoes-2871.html

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/potato-diet#rules